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Events for Wednesday 22nd of November 2017

Peter Heaton

Over the past eighteen months I have spent many days walking in the Yorkshire Wolds trying to connect the idea of an inner landscape with the reality of outer ones.
The images produced for this project overlay layers of text, which relate to thoughts, ideas and observations made during this time, over black and white images of the distinctive Wolds landscapes .

The Text layers in the images are key and function on several levels, often the words used to describe aspects of a landscape can also be use to describe feelings or mental states, isolated, harrowing, edgy, inacessible, whilst our obsession with the weather is dominant in all the images, set fair, clearing rain, overcast. The limits of a photograph are tested, as events happening outside of the frame, and indeed the time frame of the image are referred to , white noise falls soundlessly, kites soar out of view, a smell of rain in the ears… the structure of the composition and indeed the media is explored, distance flattened, a Wet Colloidan glow, extreme cropping. Whilst the issues of our stewardship of the countryside and access to it, are integral, hedgehogs still missing, a pattern of refusal, agitation necessary.

The unique Wolds landscape has not been immune to the effects suffered across the county as a whole due to intensive farming methods, increased pollution and population growth. There has been a consequent drastic decrease in the numbers of some species of birds, animals and butterflies which were previously common sights in the Wolds grasslands. Between 1972 and 1996 Skylarks have declined by 75%, Curlews by 64%, many previously common species of butterflies such as the Dingy Skipper and Brown Argus and Green Hairstreak are now extremely rare and seldom seen in the Wolds. The water vole population in the Wolds has dropped by 90% percent due to the intrusion of American Mink.

There are twenty pieces of work in the project, they are printed as limited edition prints, size 66cm x 44cm, on Aluminium Dibond material.


8.00pm

Rhiannon Giddens - Sold Out

Following the release of her second solo album Freedom Highway, Rhiannon Giddens, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and founding member of Grammy Award-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, will tour the UK and Ireland this autumn including a date at PAC.

Nonesuch Records released Freedom Highway to widespread critical acclaim in February. The record includes nine original songs Giddens wrote or co-wrote while she and her band toured after Tomorrow Is My Turn’s 2015 release, along with a traditional song and two civil rights-era songs, ‘Birmingham Sunday’ and Staple Singers’ well-known ‘Freedom Highway’, from which the album takes its name.

Giddens co-produced Freedom Highway with multi-instrumentalist Dirk Powell in his Breaux Bridge, Louisiana studio, with the bulk of recording done in wooden rooms built prior to the Civil War. As producers, Giddens and Powell sought to release the stories already in the walls, allowing the space to be a voice in itself. This approach allowed for an emotional fearlessness and presence not always easy to achieve in the studio. Together they assembled the players, which included her superb touring band, local musicians from the bayou, a soulful horn section from New York, and talented family members. The principle recording was done over an intense eight day period. The result is an album that is rawer and more personal than its predecessor.

Giddens, who had previously won accolades and a Grammy Award as a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, made her solo debut with Tomorrow Is My Turn, which was one 2015’s most highly praised albums; The New York Times said, ‘her voice is a perpetually soulful marvel’, NPR said, Giddens ‘puts her own breathtaking mark on songs by Patsy Cline, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Nina Simone, and others’, and the Guardian called it a ‘solo debut of phenomenal vocal power, effortlessly jumping between gospel holler, tender folk song, and lachrymose country ballad’.  The album was Grammy nominated, and Giddens received the BBC Radio 2 Folk Award for Singer of the Year and the Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Bluegrass and Banjo.

rhiannongiddens.com

Giddens collides the past and the present on her remarkably wise and timely new album. Freedom Highway is full of songs which were written over the past few years but sound like they've been lurking around the American subconscious for centuries, passed along by oral tradition or via song collectors and academics until they found their way to this particular singer, to this particular album, to this particular moment in history.’ Uncut – Album of the Month

£22.50